Andrea Giordano

Professor, University of Padua

Andrea Giordano is a full professor at the University of Padova (IT), member of the VV – Visualizing Venice Steering Committee, and coordinator of the project’s interoperable 3D modeling and representation.

His research focuses on new tools for the visualization and multimedia representation of architectural and urban transformation, geometric-configurative interpretations of architectural surfaces, and representational codes for verifying landscape design. He is the coordinator of the Architecture and Engineering program at the University of Padova, where he heads the Laboratory of Drawing and Representation (LDR) and the Laboratory of Information Modeling (LIM) at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile ed Ambientale (ICEA). He is also responsible for the survey, representation, and digital rendition of the university’s campus. He has published several essays on the theory and history of methods of representation, dealing, most recently, with the use of ICT for research in the field of representation.


Projects

Eremitani

Sta. Chiara Choir Screen

Visualizing Venice

Nicola Lercari

Postdoctoral Associate & Co-Coordinator, Venice Virtual World

Nicola Lercari, Ph.D., is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University where he investigates visualization technologies applied to the humanities, cross-media systems for museums, and 3D real-time environment for education and gaming. Nicola received his Ph.D. in History and Computing from the University of Bologna, Italy with a dissertation on the visualization of medieval urban spaces (developing the NuM.E. 2010 project, a multimodal simulation of Piazza di Porta Ravegnana and the cloth market Mercato di Mezzo in XIII century Bologna). Nicola has worked on several digital humanities initiatives both in Italy (CINECA supercomputing center and University of Bologna) and in the United States (University of California Merced and Duke University). Currently he contributes to the digital scholarship activities of the Wired! Lab as 3D visualization specialist (taking part to the Humanities Writ Large project Visualizing Venice Game). Nicola is also a founding member of the Dig@Lab, digital archaeology initiative, where he takes part in the international research projects 3D – Digging at Çatalhöyük (excavation and digital documentation of a Neolithic city in Central Anatolia) and Regium@Lepidi (reconstruction of the Roman city Regium Lepidi) as supervisor for laser scanning, digital documentation, and real-time visualization. He is also a member of the Visualization and Information System (VIS) research group where he works on 3D and immersive visualization projects at the DiVE (Duke Immersive Visualization System).


Courses

Virtual Form & Space


Projects

Venice Virtual World

Manuela Maggipinto

Visiting Student, Building Engineering & Architecture, University of Padua

I am a Building Engineering and Architectural graduate student, from University of Padua, Italy. I am really interested in arts and architecture. During my studies I learned the importance of software for visualization and especially 2D and 3D technical drawing. Through my graduate thesis I analyze how a restoration project could be managed by these software.

At the Wired! Lab, I am involved in the Building Duke project to make an interactive digital 3D model of campus developments since the 1920s.


Projects

Building Duke

Julia McHugh

Trent A. Carmichael Curator of Academic Initiatives, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art History
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Julia K. McHugh, Ph.D., is the Trent A. Carmichael Curator of Academic Initiatives, a position in which she develops exhibitions and interdisciplinary collaborations with Duke faculty, students, and staff at the Nasher Museum of Art. She also serves as Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art History and directs the Museum Theory and Practice concentration. McHugh specializes in ancient and colonial Latin American art and earned her Ph.D. in Art History from the University of California, Los Angeles. Prior to the Nasher, she was the Douglass Foundation Fellow in American Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and a Research Assistant at the Getty Research Institute, where she assisted with the production of Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas, a major exhibition of Pre-Columbian art. She has also held positions in the curatorial and education departments of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. She is interested in the ways in which technology can facilitate close looking in museums and enhance the visitor experience.


Projects

Art of the Americas Interactive

Cosimo Monteleone

Researcher, University of Padua

Cosimo Monteleone is a researcher in Representation of Architecture and Descriptive Geometry at the University of Padua (IT). He is currently working on history of drawing and, in particular, in Renaissance perspective. He is a member of the international research collaborative Visualizing Venice (http://visualizingvenice.org). Indeed, his interest focuses also in new technologies – digital survey, 3D modeling, multimedia outputs, and Augmented Reality – for displaying historical transformations of architecture and the city. He directed several digital and multimedia projects linked to historical and scientific exhibitions, for example: Piero della Francesca. Il disegno tra arte e scienza (Reggio Emila – IT – 2015) and Daniele Barbaro (1514-70). Letteratura, scienza e arti nella Venezia del Rinascimento (Venice – IT – 2016).

His several scientific essays focus on analysis and representation of architecture and art, and the application of science in art. He is also the author of a book titled Frank Lloyd Wright. Geometria e astrazione nel Guggenheim Museum published by Aracne in 2013.


Projects

Eremitani

Sta. Chiara Choir Screen

Visualizing Venice

Adriano Napoli

MA Student, University of Catania

Adriano Napoli received his bachelor’s degree in Cultural Heritage and is now an MA student in Art History at the University of Catania (Italy). His research focuses on Norman architecture in Eastern Sicily, with special reference to connections with Byzantium and the greater Mediterranean context. He is also a student at Scuola Superiore of the University of Catania and collaborates with the Siculorum Gymnasium review.


Projects

The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database

Raquel Salvatella de Prada

Assistant Professor of the Practice of Visual and Media Arts
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Raquel Salvatella de Prada is a computer artist and assistant professor of the practice of Visual and Media Arts. She practices graphic design, motion graphics and video design. Her work often focuses on integrating computer animation and motion design with different traditional art forms by collaborating with artists of diverse backgrounds such as printmaking, painting, installation art, poetry, puppetry, theater, and musical performance. She finds that the combination of her digital medium with physical visual media can be a powerful way to communicate social issues. Her experimental animation work and her collaborative performance pieces have been featured at festivals and on stages across the country and internationally.


Courses

3D Modeling & Animation

Motion Graphics in Film & Video


Projects

Augmenting Urban Experiences


Publications & Presentations

Dillon, Sheila, Mark J.V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials.” Invited Presentation. C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. February 17, 2010.

Annabel Wharton

William B. Hamilton Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Annabel Jane Wharton, William B. Hamilton Professor of Art History, Duke University, received her Ph.D. at the Courtauld Institute, London University. In 2015, she was the Vincent Scully Visiting Professor of Architectural History at the Yale University School of Architecture. She has also received major fellowships from Dumbarton Oaks, the ACLS, The Center for Advanced Study of the Visual Arts at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., and the National Humanities Center. Initially her research focused on Late Ancient and Byzantine art and culture. Her works from her early career included Art of Empire (Penn State), Tokali Kilise (Dumbarton Oaks/Harvard); Refiguring the Post-Classical City (Cambridge). With Building the Cold War: Hilton International Hotels and Modern Architecture (Chicago, 2001), she began to investigate the effects of modernity on ancient landscapes. She has combined her pre-Modern and Modern interests in her last two books, Selling Jerusalem: Relics, Replicas, Theme Parks (Chicago, 2006) and Architectural Agents: The Delusional, Abusive, Addictive Lives of Buildings (Minnesota, 2015). Continuing to investigate the agency of things, she has begun work on a new book project treating models—conceptual and material, analog and digital, tentatively titled Manipulating Models: Diagnostic, Phenomenal, Architectural.


Courses

Proseminar II on Models

Claire Woods

Associate Professor of Classical Studies
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Cristina Zago

Visiting Student, Building Engineering & Architecture, University of Padua

Cristina Zago is studying Building Engineering and Architecture at the University of Padua. In her studies she has focused on the restorations and the structural problems of buildings and their visualization with multimedia tools. To support this research she has learned to used different programs for drawing and for created 3D modeling.

She is currently working on the project with Kristin Huffman’s project about Ludovico Ughi’s map of Venice of the XVIII century for the future exibition that will be at Duke and in Venice. She also is following the VMS 326 Unity 3D Programming course to learn how to transfer 3D models into virtual reality environments.


Projects

Imagining Venice