Andrea Basso

Visiting Student, Building Engineering & Architecture, University of Padua

Andrea Basso is currently studying Building Engineering and Architecture at the University of Padua. In these years he has learned how new multimedia tools can be implemented in the field of Architecture and Engineering, and how they can improve both the visualization and the construction process of the buildings. He is currently working on the church of S. Chiara in Naples with Caroline Bruzelius, Lucas Giles, and his fellow student from Italy, Elisa Castagna, investigating the architecture of the past with the 3D visualization media. He is also developing the theme of display of architectural models through the study of UNITY software and of BIM models’ transfer into virtual reality environments such as the Duke Immersive Virtual Environment.


Projects

Sta. Chiara Choir Screen

Brad Blankemeyer

Visiting Scholar 2018-19

Bradley Blankemeyer is a fourth-year DPhil student in History at the University of Oxford researching early modern Portugal and its overseas empire. His doctoral thesis, entitled ‘”Multiplex est modus”: Elements of Accommodation in the Early Jesuit Missions to India, 1545-1575’, deals with mission methodologies of the earliest Jesuits in southwest India and the effects of various religious and secular factors on their distinct objectives and priorities. Relying predominantly on the correspondence of these individuals, Bradley came to the Wired! Lab to develop a digital project mapping the vast network of Jesuit letters across locations throughout the Indian Ocean and southern Europe. He is also currently collaborating with Ed Triplett and Philip Stern on a project modelling English and Portuguese dominions in the Indian Ocean during the 17th century.

Tolly Boatwright

Professor of Ancient Studies, Department of Classical Studies
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Irreversibly influenced by studying in Rome during my twenties, I center much of my research on ancient Roman topography and on how Rome’s built and created environment intersected with social, political and cultural history.  Recurrent interests are the roles and visibility of Roman women, both at the top of Rome’s hierarchies (as in my current project on Rome’s imperial women), and much lower down (as with “Children and Parents on the Tombstones of Pannonia,” in The Roman Family IV; and 2011’s “Women and Gender in the Forum Romanum”).  I have used the multifaceted and fascinating emperor Hadrian as a way to address larger issues in Roman history, publishing Hadrian and the City of Rome (1987) and Hadrian and the Cities of the Roman Empire (2000).  Maps and visual material culture are key to other research, from Peoples of the Roman World (2013) to my recent “Visualizing Empire in Imperial Rome,” on Agrippa’s Map and its environs in Rome.


Courses

Roman Frontiers

Paolo Borin

PhD student, Università IUAV di Venezia

Paolo Borin is a PhD student at the Università IUAV di Venezia. His thesis explores the science and stereotomy of Guarino Guarini through digital and computational modeling techniques. Borin graduated with a degree in Architectural Engineering from University of Padua in 2011 with honors. His thesis analyzes how prefabrication and BIM could lead to low cost and high quality buildings. From 2011 he has been exploring theory and practise of Building Information Modeling and applying it to enhance the building process. Within Visualizing Venice, he’s studying how to merge information and digital modeling to set up an effective knowledge base for Digital Humanities.


Projects

Ghett/App

Visualizing Venice

Laura Moure Cecchini

Assistant Professor of Art & Art History, Colgate University
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I graduated from Duke University with a PhD in Art History in 2016. My area of specialization is the history and theory of European art of the 19th and 20th centuries, with an emphasis on art, photography, and design produced in Italy from the Unification to World War 2. I am currently writing my dissertation, in which I analyze how key Italian artists, critics, and art historians from the 1880s and up to 1945 invoked Baroque tropes to interpret the experience of Modernity. I am also interested in the artistic and cultural exchanges between Italy and Latin America, in particular Mexico and Argentina. I have a B.A. in Philosophy from Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico City), and a M.Phil. in Philosophy from National Autonomous University of Mexico (Mexico City).


Projects

A Portrait of Venice

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Cecchini, Laura Moure. “The “Mostra del Quarantennio” and the Canon of Modern Art at the Venice Biennale in the Interwar Period,” Il Capitale Culturale, Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage  “Museums and Exhibitions between WWI and WWII” 14: 223-252.

Presentations

Di Stefano, Chiara, and Laura Moure Cecchini, “Between the Ephemeral and the Virtual: Reactivating Art Installations through Digital Reconstructions,” Panel Organization, College Art Association, Washington, D.C, February 3-6, 2016.

Dissertation

Moure Cecchini, Laura. “Reimagining the Baroque in Italian Modernism: From the fin-de-siècle to Lucio Fontana.” PhD dissertation, 2016.

Elisa Castagna

Visiting Student, Building Engineering & Architecture, University of Padua

Elisa Castagna is a fifth-year student of five-years single-cycle degree in Building Engineering and Architecture at the University of Padua. During these four years at the university she has been focused on the study of engineering and architectural subjects, taking a close interest in the use of IT tools for the development of architectural models and in the field of construction process. She is currently working on the church of S. Chiara in Naples with Caroline Bruzelius and Lucas Giles, developing the theme of display of architectural models through the study of UNITY software and of BIM models’ transfer into virtual reality environments such as the Duke Immersive Virtual Environment.


Projects

Sta. Chiara Choir Screen

Davide Contiero

Visiting Student, Building Engineering & Architecture, University of Padua

My name is Davide, I am 24. I am studying at University of Padua in Building Engineering and Architecture. I am learning how multimedia programs can improve the visualization and the building construction process. Especially in this last field I will focus my master degree thesis. I would like to develop programs which allow you to facilitate the building construction process. Here at Duke I am working on a Krakow project with Professor Jaskot investigating the plan of the city of the past through 3D programs.


Projects

Mapping German Construction

Alexandra Dodson

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies | Graduated 2016
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Alexandra Dodson is a PhD candidate working with Prof. Caroline Bruzelius. Alexandra’s research is focused on the artistic and architectural patronage of the Carmelite Order in central Italy in the 13th and 14th centuries. She is interested in the use of digital technologies for the visualization of historic materials and is a contributor to Visualizing Venice, an international collaborative using technologies to illustrate the urban and architectural history of Venice. Alexandra received a BA in Art History with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2006.


Courses

Wired!

The Museum Inside Out

Rock, Paper, Chisel: The Materiality and Context of Medieval Art


Projects

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA)


Publications & Presentations

Dodson, Alexandra and Erica Sherman. “Visualizing Venice.” Poster presentation. College Art Association Annual Conference. Los Angeles, CA. February 22-25, 2012.

Sherman, Erica and Alexandra Dodson. “Visualizing Venice: Tracking Historical Change with New Technologies.” ICERI (International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation). Madrid, Spain. November 14-16, 2011.

Dissertation

Dodson, Alexandra. “Mount Carmel in the Commune: Promoting the Holy Land in Central Italy in the 13th and 14th Centuries.” PhD dissertation, 2016.

Maurizio Forte

William and Sue Gross Professor of Classical Studies Art, Art History, & Visual Studies
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My scientific activity has been particularly focused from the beginning on a strong multidisciplinary approach to the development of virtual heritage and digital archaeology. During my degree, MA, PhD and Specialization in Archaeology I have always integrated traditional courses in Ancient Art History, Etruscology, Roman and Greek Archaeology, Landscape Archaeology, Papirology, Egyptology, Pre-Colombian Archaeology, and Ancient Topography with more experimental activities in computing labs and with the use of digital technologies. I have started to use computer applications in archaeology in the early 80s during my degree in Ancient History. At that time, I was particularly attracted by the idea that digital computing could changed the methodology of research in archaeology and, in general, in the humanities. For this reason, I spent ten years working in a Supercomputing Center in Italy (CINECA, Bologna, http://www.cineca.it/en) co-fouding with other colleagues the Visual Lab, one of the first labs in Europe dedicated to visual applications and image processing in archaeology and cultural heritage. It was a very pionering experience focused on the use of techniques of computer vision for the reconstruction of artifacts, monuments and sites. All this work was aimed at integrating technology with field work data from cultural heritage sites. I define “virtual heritage” as the digital information that is derived from a physical site, whether it is an object, monument, territory, or landscape. This information must be processed both by computer programs but also, and more importantly, by our perceptions, interpretations, knowledge, cultural awareness and finally communicated through dissemination. The research in which I have been most involved is concerned with the reconstruction of archaeological and ancient landscapes in a virtual format. This has meant working with digital technologies such as 3D documentation, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, spatial technologies, open software WEB-VRGIS and virtual reality. Having created a virtual reconstruction, my efforts were then directed to the epistemology of this form of presentation, one aspect of eco-anthropological thinking. I have coordinated archaeological projects in Italy, Ethiopia, Egypt, Oman, India, China, Honduras, Mexico, Spain and Turkey, always integrating theoretical approaches and new methodologies of research.

Ludovica Galeazzo

Independent Scholar

Ludovica Galeazzo is an architectural and urban historian whose research focuses on Italian architecture of the Early Modern Age. She is currently a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies where she works on the project A portrait of Venice.

During the last few years she has engaged with digital humanities, with a special interest on new technologies (GIS system, geo-spatial mapping techniques and 3D modeling) applied to urban history in order to explain evolution of place and space over time.

From 2011 she is a member of the international research Visualizing Venice (http://visualizingvenice.org), and she has been involved in several projects about the Accademia, the water and food supply in the lagoon system, and the Venetian Ghetto.

Galeazzo graduated from the University Iuav of Venice in Architecture with honors in 2010 with a thesis on Montepulciano (Siena) and city museums in small towns. In 2014 she received a Ph.D in History of Arts at the Doctoral School Ca’ Foscari-Iuav with a dissertation on the development of the insula of Gesuiti in Venice from the second half of the 15th century to the end of the Venetian Republic.

She is author of several articles about the Venetian urban and architectural history, and she is going to publish her dissertation with the Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti.


Projects

Ghett/App

A Portrait of Venice

Venice & the Museum of the City

Visualizing Venice


News & Events

Visualizing Venice: The Ghetto of Venice

Visualizing Venice: The Biennale & The City

Visualizing Venice: The City & The Lagoon

Visualizing Venice: The Ghetto of Venice

Visualizing Venice: The Waters of Venice