Elizabeth Baltes

Assistant Professor of Art History, Department of Visual Arts, Coastal Carolina University
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Elizabeth Baltes received her PhD in Greek and Roman Art & Archaeology from Duke in 2016. Her research interests lie at the intersection of sculpture, politics, and public space in the Greek world. She has published on the changing statue landscapes of both ancient Athens and the sacred island of Delos. Her current project, tentatively titled, “Portraits of Honor, Monuments of Disrepute,” traces the practice of setting up public honorific portrait statues from antiquity to the present. Through a series of cases studies, it also examines the variety of responses to existing monuments when communities no longer wish to hold these individuals up as exemplars worthy of such honors. She is the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, and her dissertation research was supported by the Archaeological Institute of America.


Courses

Wired!

The Museum Inside Out


Projects

Aphrodisias

Building Duke

Death, burial and commemoration in Athens from antiquity to the late 19th century

Delos

Statues Speak


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Dillon, Sheila, and Elizabeth Palmer Baltes. “Honorific Practices and the Politics of Space on Hellenistic Delos.” American Journal of Archaeology 117 (2013): 207-46.

Book Chapters

Baltes, Elizabeth P. “Itinerant Statues? The Portrait Landscape of the Athenian Agora,” in Greek Art in Context, edited by D. Rodríguez-Pérez. Ashgate, in press.

Dissertation

Baltes, Elizabeth P. “Dedication and Display of Portrait Statues in Hellenistic Greece: Spatial Practices and Identity Politics.” PhD dissertation, 2016.

Presentations

Baltes, Elizabeth P. “In the Round: Using Digital Technologies to Recontextualize Classical Sculpture,” University of North Carolina/Duke Classics Colloquium, Chapel Hill, NC. March 20, 2010.

Baltes, Elizabeth P. “The 3-D Model, Double-Spaced with 1” Margins: Reformulating the Digital Dissertation,” Panel Presentation, Digital Scholarly Communication – Notes from the Wired! Lab for Digital Historical Visualization, HASTAC 2011 Conference, Ann Arbor, MI, December 2, 2011.

Baltes, Elizabeth P. “Three Art Historians, a Computer Scientist, and a Digital Artist Walk into a Classroom…” Panel Presentation, Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology (AHPT), Annual meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC), Greensboro, NC. November 1, 2013.

Baltes, Elizabeth P. “A Critique of Digital Modeling,” Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology – Greece Conference, Rethymno, Greece. March 7-8, 2014.

Baltes, Elizabeth P., Caroline Bruzelius, Hannah L. Jacobs, and Timothy Shea. “Digital Thinking and Art History: Re-Imagining Teaching, Research, and the Museum.” Intermezzo Speaking Series, Art, Art History & Visual Studies. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 29, 2015.

Olson, Mark J.V. and Elizabeth P. Baltes, Erica Sherman, Victoria Szabo. “Digital Scholarly Communication – Notes from the Wired! Lab for Digital Historical Visualization,” HASTAC 2011 Conference, Ann Arbor, MI, December 02, 2011.

Nathan Bullock

PhD student in Architectural History, Certificate in Feminist Theory

Nathan Bullock is an architectural historian working on modern and contemporary architectural theory and criticism. His fields of interest intersect architecture with politics and culture.


Projects

Building Duke

Laura Moure Cecchini

Assistant Professor of Art & Art History, Colgate University
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I graduated from Duke University with a PhD in Art History in 2016. My area of specialization is the history and theory of European art of the 19th and 20th centuries, with an emphasis on art, photography, and design produced in Italy from the Unification to World War 2. I am currently writing my dissertation, in which I analyze how key Italian artists, critics, and art historians from the 1880s and up to 1945 invoked Baroque tropes to interpret the experience of Modernity. I am also interested in the artistic and cultural exchanges between Italy and Latin America, in particular Mexico and Argentina. I have a B.A. in Philosophy from Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico City), and a M.Phil. in Philosophy from National Autonomous University of Mexico (Mexico City).


Projects

A Portrait of Venice

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Cecchini, Laura Moure. “The “Mostra del Quarantennio” and the Canon of Modern Art at the Venice Biennale in the Interwar Period,” Il Capitale Culturale, Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage  “Museums and Exhibitions between WWI and WWII” 14: 223-252.

Presentations

Di Stefano, Chiara, and Laura Moure Cecchini, “Between the Ephemeral and the Virtual: Reactivating Art Installations through Digital Reconstructions,” Panel Organization, College Art Association, Washington, D.C, February 3-6, 2016.

Dissertation

Moure Cecchini, Laura. “Reimagining the Baroque in Italian Modernism: From the fin-de-siècle to Lucio Fontana.” PhD dissertation, 2016.

Alexandra Dodson

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies | Graduated 2016
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Alexandra Dodson is a PhD candidate working with Prof. Caroline Bruzelius. Alexandra’s research is focused on the artistic and architectural patronage of the Carmelite Order in central Italy in the 13th and 14th centuries. She is interested in the use of digital technologies for the visualization of historic materials and is a contributor to Visualizing Venice, an international collaborative using technologies to illustrate the urban and architectural history of Venice. Alexandra received a BA in Art History with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2006.


Courses

Wired!

The Museum Inside Out

Rock, Paper, Chisel: The Materiality and Context of Medieval Art


Projects

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA)


Publications & Presentations

Dodson, Alexandra and Erica Sherman. “Visualizing Venice.” Poster presentation. College Art Association Annual Conference. Los Angeles, CA. February 22-25, 2012.

Sherman, Erica and Alexandra Dodson. “Visualizing Venice: Tracking Historical Change with New Technologies.” ICERI (International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation). Madrid, Spain. November 14-16, 2011.

Dissertation

Dodson, Alexandra. “Mount Carmel in the Commune: Promoting the Holy Land in Central Italy in the 13th and 14th Centuries.” PhD dissertation, 2016.

Iara Dundas

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Iara Dundas is a doctoral student in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University studying the architecture of Early Modern France and Italy. Iara earned her B.A. in Art History from the University of Central Florida in 2007 and an M.A. (with distinction) in Art History from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2010.  She is particularly interested in ephemera and the relationship between temporary structures and permanent structures, especially within the context of court and religious festivals and spectacles. Other areas of research include the history and architecture of theater and performance, the Early Modern Jesuits, and the intersections of art and science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.


Courses

Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice

The Museum Inside Out

Splendor of the City: The Art and Architecture of Renaissance Venice


Projects

A Portrait of Venice

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA)

Venice Virtual World

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Dundas, Iara and Elizabeth Narkin. “How Can Visualization Technologies Help Us to Teach and Learn Architectural History?” Panel Presentation, Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities. Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC). Greensboro, NC. November 1, 2013.

Katherine Jentleson

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies | Graduated 2016
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I am a PhD student in the department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke University. I specialize in the art of the United States, with a focus on modern and contemporary art. After my preliminary examinations in April 2013, I will officially begin my dissertation on the history of folk and self-taught art in the United States. Drawing on interdisciplinary methodologies, including Social Network Analysis, I hope to demonstrate and reflect on the evolution of the category of self-taught art in American institutions, beginning with the MoMA’s 1930s exhibitions and moving to current phenomenon, such as the Outsider Art Fair and the near-closure of the American Folk Art Museum. Before I came to Duke in 2010, I worked in the publishing industry, beginning at Harper’s magazine and spending several years as as editor at Art+Auction. I am currently part of a team at Duke that is developing a pedagogical game called Fantasy Collecting that will “gameify” the task of memorization associated with survey courses and teach students about the forces that govern the art market.


Projects

“Not as Rewarding as the North:” Holger Cahill’s Southern Folk Art Expedition


Publications & Presentations

Dissertation

Jentleson, Katherine. “Gatecrashers: The First Generation of Outsider Artists in America.” PhD dissertation, 2015.

Elisabeth Narkin

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies | Graduated 2017
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Elisabeth Narkin is a PhD candidate in Duke University’s Department of Art History and Visual Studies, where she studies the architecture of Early Modern France. Elisabeth received her B.A. summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in Art History and French from Boston College in 2007 and an M.A. in Art History from The George Washington University in 2009. Her research interests include French court society, architectural spaces for royal children and families, and the convergence of public and private spaces.

In addition to working with Wired!, Elisabeth is currently researching and writing her dissertation, “Rearing the Royals: Architecture and the Spatialization of Royal Childhood in France, 1499-1610,” which analyzes the manner in which the social life of the French court and royal family unfolded in the architectural spaces of châteaux located in and around Paris.


Courses

The Museum Inside Out


Projects

On with their Heads: Creation, Destruction, and Digital Recontextualization

A Portrait of Venice

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Dundas, Iara and Elizabeth Narkin. “How Can Visualization Technologies Help Us to Teach and Learn Architectural History?” Panel Presentation, Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities. Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC). Greensboro, NC. November 1, 2013.

Dissertation

Dawn Narkin, Elisabeth. “Rearing the Royals: Architecture and the Spatialization of Royal Childhood in France, 1499-1610.” PhD dissertation, 2017.

Erica Sherman

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies | Graduated 2017
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Publications & Presentations

Dissertation

Sherman, Erica. “Urban Agents: Confraternities, Devotion and the Formation of a New Urban State in Eighteenth-Century Minas Gerais.” PhD dissertation, 2017.

Presentations

Dodson, Alexandra and Erica Sherman. “Visualizing Venice.” Poster presentation. College Art Association Annual Conference. Los Angeles, CA. February 22-25, 2012.

Gianighian, Giorgio and Erica Sherman. “Robotics and Cultural Heritage.” RICH 2012: Robotics Innovation for Cultural Heritage. Venice, Italy. December 3-4, 2012.

Olson, Mark J.V. and Elizabeth P. Baltes, Erica Sherman, Victoria Szabo. “Digital Scholarly Communication – Notes from the Wired! Lab for Digital Historical Visualization,” HASTAC 2011 Conference, Ann Arbor, MI, December 02, 2011.

Sherman, Erica and Alexandra Dodson. “Visualizing Venice: Tracking Historical Change with New Technologies.” ICERI (International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation). Madrid, Spain. November 14-16, 2011.


News & Events

Visualizing Venice: The Waters of Venice

Joseph Williams

PhD in Art, Art History & Visual Studies '17
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In addition to serving as the Project Manager of the Kingdom of Sicily Image Database, Joseph Williams is an assistant professor of architectural history in the University of Maryland Architecture Program. Williams specializes in the architecture of medieval South Italy and the greater Mediterranean. His research concerns the economics of church building during the medieval trade boom, the pan-Mediterranean exchange of building techniques, and the role of construction process in medieval design. These themes are central to Williams’s forthcoming book Architecture of Disjuncture: Mediterranean Trade and Cathedral Building in a New Diocese (11th-13th Centuries CE). This monograph on the “Duomo Vecchio” (old cathedral) of Molfetta offers a method for studying buildings that, by necessity, adopted hybrid and changing designs. Williams incorporates a variety of digital technologies into his research and teaching, such as digital photogrammetry, parametric 3-D modeling, and GIS mapping.

Williams holds a Ph.D. in Art, Art History & Visual Studies from Duke University and was awarded a Rome Prize in Medieval Studies from the American Academy in Rome (September 2016 – July 2018).


Courses

Introduction to Art History


Projects

The Alife Arch

The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Database


Publications & Presentations

Database

Medieval Kingdom of Sicily: A Database of Monuments and Sites. Project Director: Caroline Bruzelius; Project Managers: Paola Vitolo and Joseph C. Williams; Project Collaborators: Gabriella Cianciolo, Francesco Gangemi, Luciana Mocciola, Ruggero Longo, Alba Irollo; Metadata and Image Management Consultant: John J. Taormina; Technical Consultant and Database/Web Developer: David Tremmel.

Dissertation

Williams, Joseph C. “Mediterranean Trade and Architectural Production: The Church of S. Corrado in Molfetta (Apulia) ca. 1100-1300 CE.” PhD dissertation, 2017.

 


News & Events

Ad-Hoc Architecture, by Design

Former Graduate Assistant joins University of Maryland Faculty