The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Athens

ARTHIST 208 | CLST 248

Sheila Dillon

Nikos Gkiokas

MW 11:45am - 1:00pm | Smith Warehouse, Bay 11, Rm A233, Wired! Lab

Athens was one of the great cities of antiquity.  As the place in which democracy, philosophy, and the theater were born, it is foundational for understanding much of the development of the western world. With its unusually rich surviving material and literary record, it forms an ideal setting in which to explore relationships of ancient to modern, landscape to built-scape, material to literary record amongst others.  This course, team-taught by professors at both Duke University and The American College of Greece-Deree, will use the Classical through Roman visible physical remains of Athens as a focus to explore the changing face of the city through in-class and cross-continent reading and debate, digital creation and on-site exploration.  Teamwork between students in Greece and the US will be a major component of the course. Students will learn to manage and present information with Omeka and Neatline.

NB: The course includes a mandatory, full-funded trip to Athens during Spring Break. The enrollment cap is therefore set to 10. Preference will be given to sophomores and juniors, and to those students interested in learning digital visualization tools.

Students on site, spring break 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Digital Durham

Spring 2020 | Spring 2018

ISS 356S/758S | VMS 358S | EDUC 356S | HISTORY 382S-01

Trudi Abel, Victoria Szabo

T 1:40-4:10pm | Rubenstein 350

The Digital Durham seminar is based on the idea that understanding the
past is a civic virtue. The course fosters awareness of the complexity
of Durham communities, including the interconnections of the white and
African-American communities in the past. The project lays bare
Durham’s experience of industrialization, immigration, segregation,
and urbanization and demonstrates how that history shapes the present
and the future. Students will engage with a broad array of primary
sources in the Rubenstein Library including maps, photographs, census
data and handwritten letters from the nineteenth century–and digital
tools which they will use to share and interpret historical documents.

Course Attributes:

Seminar
(R) Research
(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
(W) Writing
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance

This course was part of a Bass Connections 2017-18 project.

Image Credit


Projects

Digital Durham