Art of Renaissance Venice

Fall 2018

ARTHIST 190FS-01 | MEDREN 190FS-01 | ITALIAN 190FS-01

Kristin L. Huffman

W 1:25-3:55pm | Nasher Museum Seminar Rm 119

The course presents an expansive picture of the art and society of Renaissance Venice. Residents, both individually and collectively, fashioned an image of the city as unprecedented and exceptional through art and architecture. Venice was indeed unique— a city built on water— and sponsors commissioned works of art as a way to promote the city as unparalleled in beauty, splendor, and glory. The thriving economy and possibility for work attracted some of the most important artists practicing at the time, including Titian, Veronese, and Jacopo Sansovino. While advancing the city’s claims, these artists quickly learned how to capitalize on visual language for self-promotion and career advancement; patrons did too. The class considers a range of artistic patronage, a spectrum of artistic commissions, and a number of the most celebrated Renaissance artists.

This course is part of the Scientists, Artists, and Lawyers of Medieval and Renaissance Europe 2018 FOCUS cluster.

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 1

Fall 2020 | Fall 2019 | Fall 2018 | Fall 2017 | Fall 2016 | Fall 2015 | Fall 2014

ARTHIST 580S-01 | HCVIS 580S-01 | ISS 580S-01 | VMS 580S-01

Victoria Szabo & Hannah Jacobs

W 3:05PM - 5:35PM | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Overview of topics in digital humanities and computational media, with special attention to visual media. Studies of critical digital heritage, virtuality and culture, information aesthetics, information design, digital storytelling. Interactivity and online content management through databases, collaborative blogs, and online archives. Data visualization and mapping based on textual, image, and quantitative sources. Mini-projects based on existing and new research data from existing projects in the Wired! Lab, the CMAC labs, and other sources. Best practices for digital research project planning and collaboration. Instructor consent required.

This course is a core part of the MA in Digital Art History/Computational Media.

Mapping History with GIS

Fall 2020 |Spring 2020 | Fall 2018 | Fall 2017

ISS 315-01/715-01 | VMS 304-01 | ARTHIST 315-01

Edward Triplett

M 10:05AM - 12:35PM | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 12, Rm A228)

This is a beginner/intermediate Geographic Information System (GIS) course designed to help students design maps and spatial diagrams of historical subjects. The class emphasizes perspectives, procedures, and tools that are relevant to art and architectural history, but students will also learn that most spatial methods are inter-disciplinary. Although geared toward art history, students from any discipline are welcome. This course is designed as a hybrid lecture/lab format in which direct instruction is supplemented by hands on learning labs using ArcGIS software and real-world spatial data. The main skills students will gain are:

· Integration of spatial and tabular data
· Geoprocessing
· Data visualization
· Creating features
· Editing Features
· Vector and Raster Integration
· Spatial Analysis
· Georeferencing

Course Attributes:

(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
Cross-listed in another department
(CZ) Civilizations

History of Pre-Modern Architecture

Fall 2018

ARTHIST 184D | HISTORY 144D

Paul Jaskot

MW 11:45am-1:00pm | Smith, Bay 10, A266

Surveys the history of pre-modern architecture, from prehistoric times to the French Revolution (1789). Introduces students to basic architectural vocabulary and visual analysis. as well as some central debates in architectural history. Coursework will include a digital mapping project using Neatline.

Gothic Cathedrals

Fall 2020 | Fall 2018 | Fall 2017 | Fall 2016 | Fall 2015 | Fall 2014 | Fall 2012

ARTHIST 225-01 & 225-01L | MEDREN 215-01

Edward Triplett

TTh 3:05-4:20pm | Link Classroom 6 (Game Lab)

This course introduces students to the history and design of cathedrals and monasteries in medieval Europe. Themes include the development of Gothic architecture from Romanesque foundations in France, the importance of fractions and Euclidean geometry for medieval architects, and the material and financial costs of monumental construction projects during the middle ages. In addition to lectures and discussion, students will design a counterfactual monastery or cathedral using 3D graphics software as part of a final project. In-class tutorials will teach students how to draw plans, elevations and sections of churches and monastic buildings and how to build 3D models from these drawings.

Course Attributes:

(CCI) Cross Cultural Inquiry
(R) Research
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance
(CZ) Civilizations

This course was formerly offered by Professor Emerita Caroline Bruzelius. In Fall 2018, it was offered as a First Year Seminar under the name “Medieval Monasteries & Cathedrals.”


Projects

Cathedral of Saint Susanne