The Bauhaus

Spring 2020

ARTHIST | GERMAN | VMS 731S-01

Paul Jaskot

M 3:20-5:55pm | Smith Warehouse, Bay 10, A266

This seminar analyzes the history of the Bauhaus, from its roots in Weimar Germany to its impact on framing post World War II international Modernism. It covers major scholarship on Modernism, architecture, and design as well as central questions of twentieth-century art and politics. Grounded in the foundation and activity of the school in Germany after World War I, the seminar will also cover the spread of Bauhaus ideas, faculty, and students internationally including in Japan, Turkey, the United States, and on both sides of the Cold War.

Art and the Holocaust

Fall 2019

ARTHIST | GERMAN | HISTORY| JEWHIST | VMS 555S

Paul Jaskot

Th 10:05am-12:25pm | Smith, Bay 9, A290

This course will analyze the history of the genocide of the European Jews, and its connection to antisemitic art and cultural policy during the Nazi period. With a sound understanding of the development of oppressive policies against the Jews, and looking at a variety of media (painting, architecture, film, photography, design), the course will explore the complicated relationship between developing racist policies and the world war as they impacted and were in turn influenced by artists. Examines not only artists involved in the Nazi state, but also those who resisted in exile or were its victims.

Codes: ALP, CZ, EI, CCI

A Cultural Analysis of Ghettos

ARTHIST | GERMAN | JEWISHST | HISTORY 730S-01

Paul Jaskot

TU 6:15-8:45PM | Smith, Bay 9, A290

This seminar explores the cultural and spatial history of the Ghetto. From its origins in Venice through the spread of ghettos in Nazi-occupied Europe to the segregation of African-American populations in Chicago, specific spaces have been designated as ghettos. This designation has had an impact on the social understanding of architectural form, but it has also generated many cultural responses in material culture, art, photography, film, and other media. The course will explore the cultural understanding of the ghetto with a specific emphasis on the Jewish ghettos in Nazi-occupied Europe but with a comparative look at Venice and Chicago. Interested students may also contribute a digital project as part of their final paper contribution to this course.

Art of Renaissance Venice

Fall 2018

ARTHIST 190FS-01 | MEDREN 190FS-01 | ITALIAN 190FS-01

Kristin L. Huffman

W 1:25-3:55pm | Nasher Museum Seminar Rm 119

The course presents an expansive picture of the art and society of Renaissance Venice. Residents, both individually and collectively, fashioned an image of the city as unprecedented and exceptional through art and architecture. Venice was indeed unique— a city built on water— and sponsors commissioned works of art as a way to promote the city as unparalleled in beauty, splendor, and glory. The thriving economy and possibility for work attracted some of the most important artists practicing at the time, including Titian, Veronese, and Jacopo Sansovino. While advancing the city’s claims, these artists quickly learned how to capitalize on visual language for self-promotion and career advancement; patrons did too. The class considers a range of artistic patronage, a spectrum of artistic commissions, and a number of the most celebrated Renaissance artists.

This course is part of the Scientists, Artists, and Lawyers of Medieval and Renaissance Europe 2018 FOCUS cluster.

Building Duke: An Architectural History of Duke Campus from 1924 to Today

Spring 2020 | Spring 2019

ARTHIST 504SL | HCVIS 504SL

Kristin Huffman, Hannah Jacobs

Tu-Th 3:05-5:35pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Building Duke is a research seminar and laboratory on the architectural history of Duke Campus based on original archival materials (photos, blueprints, contracts, letters, and financial records) preserved in Duke Library collections. The course explores the variety of interpretative lenses in the field of architecture history, including (but not limited to) issues of style, patronage, labor, gender, and race. It analyzes notions of cultural identity as construed by Duke founders and administrators and as imprinted on Duke Campus by its architects and landscape designers. The students will produce original research projects based on primary materials and digital visualizations of changes in the physical fabric of Duke Campus through time.

Codes: Seminar, ALP, R

 

Image Credit: Duke University Archives


Collaborators

Brittany Forniotis

Kayla Marr

Daphne Turan

Jacqui Geerdes


Projects

Building Duke


News & Events

Building Duke Becomes Bass Connections Project Team

Digital Durham

Spring 2020 | Spring 2018

ISS 356S/758S | VMS 358S | EDUC 356S | HISTORY 382S-01

Trudi Abel, Victoria Szabo

T 1:40-4:10pm | Rubenstein 350

The Digital Durham seminar is based on the idea that understanding the
past is a civic virtue. The course fosters awareness of the complexity
of Durham communities, including the interconnections of the white and
African-American communities in the past. The project lays bare
Durham’s experience of industrialization, immigration, segregation,
and urbanization and demonstrates how that history shapes the present
and the future. Students will engage with a broad array of primary
sources in the Rubenstein Library including maps, photographs, census
data and handwritten letters from the nineteenth century–and digital
tools which they will use to share and interpret historical documents.

Course Attributes:

Seminar
(R) Research
(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
(W) Writing
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance

This course was part of a Bass Connections 2017-18 project.

Image Credit


Projects

Digital Durham

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

Spring 2020 | Spring 2018 | Spring 2017 | Spring 2015

HCVIS 581S-01 | ARTHIST 581S-01 | CMAC 581S-01 | VMS 581S-01 | ISIS 581S-01

Augustus Wendell

TuTh 1:25PM - 2:40PM | Tu in Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233) | Th in Smith, Bay 12, A228

Interactivity and online content management with 2D and 3D imaging and interactive systems.  Mini-projects based on existing and new research data from the Wired! Lab and elsewhere. Best practices for digital research project planning and collaboration. Theoretical topics include: critical digital heritage, virtuality and culture, information aesthetics, hypermedia information design.

Proseminar 1 is not a prerequisite. This course is required for all MA in Digital Art History/Computational students.

Undergraduates:

Instructor consent required.

Attributes:

Seminar
(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance


Courses

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar on Models: History, Theory & Digital Practice

Digital Places and Spaces

Fall 2017

ISS 660S | VMS 660S

Victoria Szabo

T 8:45-11:15am | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

History, theory, criticism, practice of creating digital places and spaces with maps, virtual worlds, and games. Links to “old,” analog media. Virtual environment and world-building and historical narrative, museum, mapping, and architectural practices. Project-based seminar course w/ critical readings, historical and contemporary examples, world-building. Class exhibitions, critiques, and ongoing virtual showcase. Projects might include: web and multimedia, GPS and handheld data and media capture, 2D & 3D mapping, screen-based sims and game-engine based development, sensors and biometrics, and multimodal, haptic interfaces.

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 1

Fall 2020 | Fall 2019 | Fall 2018 | Fall 2017 | Fall 2016 | Fall 2015 | Fall 2014

ARTHIST 580S-01 | HCVIS 580S-01 | ISS 580S-01 | VMS 580S-01

Victoria Szabo & Hannah Jacobs

W 3:05PM - 5:35PM | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Overview of topics in digital humanities and computational media, with special attention to visual media. Studies of critical digital heritage, virtuality and culture, information aesthetics, information design, digital storytelling. Interactivity and online content management through databases, collaborative blogs, and online archives. Data visualization and mapping based on textual, image, and quantitative sources. Mini-projects based on existing and new research data from existing projects in the Wired! Lab, the CMAC labs, and other sources. Best practices for digital research project planning and collaboration. Instructor consent required.

This course is a core part of the MA in Digital Art History/Computational Media.

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2 on Models: History, Theory & Digital Practice

Spring 2019 | Spring 2016

HCVIS 581S-01 | ISIS 581S-01 | VMS 581S-01

Mark Olson, Annabel Wharton

TH 10:05AM-12:35PM | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11 2nd Floor, A233)

Matt Ratto (2011) describes critical making as “a desire to theoretically and pragmatically connect two modes of engagement with the world that are often held separate—critical thinking, typically understood as conceptual and linguistically based, and physical ‘making,’ goal-based material work” (253). Models offer a site in which making and conceptualization are inextricably interwoven. Like models themselves, this seminar brings theory and practice together. We shall develop skills both in making models and in thinking about and through models.

Student projects will both model and analyze, theoretically and historically, a site or object of their choice. Digital 3d models will be constructed and then be presented in the form of a 20-minute conference paper and then refined and elaborated as a final paper.

Codes: Seminar, ALP, STS