Sheila Dillon

Professor of Art History and Classical Studies
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Sheila Dillon received a Ph.D. in Classical Art and Archaeology from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She teaches courses on Greek and Graeco-Roman art and archaeology. Her research interests focus on portraiture and public sculpture and on reconstructing the statuary landscape of ancient cities and sanctuaries. Her books include The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World (2010); Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture: Contexts, Subjects, and Styles (2006), which was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2008; Roman Portrait Statuary from Aphrodisias (2006); and an edited volume A Companion to Women in the Ancient World (2012). Professor Dillon was a member of the Aphrodisias Excavations in Turkey from 1992-2004, has worked at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the island of Samothrace, and now spends summers doing fieldwork in Athens. Her current projects include a history of portrait sculpture in Roman Athens, which examines the impact of Roman rule and Roman portrait styles on Athenian portraiture, and a digital mapping project of the archaeology of Athens, a collaborative endeavor centered in the Wired! Lab that involves undergraduate and graduate students at Duke and international colleagues in Athens. Professor Dillon was the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Archaeology from 2013-2016.


Courses

Wired!

Art & Archaeology of Ancient Athens  Spring 2014 | Spring 2017


Projects

Aphrodisias

Death, burial and commemoration in Athens from antiquity to the late 19th century

Digital Athens

Delos

Statues Speak


Publications & Presentations

Books & Book Chapters

Dillon, Sheila, and Timothy Shea. “Statues as Artifacts: Towards an Archaeology of Greek Sculpture.” Greek Art In Context: Archaeological and Art Historical Perspective. Routledge, 2017. 19-29.

Articles

Dillon, Sheila, and Elizabeth Palmer Baltes. “Honorific Practices and the Politics of Space on Hellenistic Delos.” American Journal of Archaeology 117 (2013): 207-46.

Presentations

Dillon, Sheila, Mark J.V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials.” Invited Presentation. C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. February 17, 2010.

Sara Galletti

Associate Professor of Art History
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Sara Galletti is an Associate Professor of Art and Architectural History. She received a joint Ph.D. in the History of Architecture and Urbanism from the Université de Paris IV–Sorbonne and the Università IUAV of Venice. Her main field of research and teaching is the history and theory of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century architecture in France. Her first book, “Le Palais du Luxembourg de Marie de Médicis, 1611-1631,” was recently published by Éditions Picard (Paris, 2012). She is currently working on two projects: (1) “Practice into Theory: Philibert Delorme, the Premier Tome de l’Architecture (1567), and the Profession of Architecture in Early Modern France,” which analyses the connections between architectural theory and practice in fifteenth- to seventeenth-century France; and (2) “Paris of Waters,” which focuses on the impact of water on the demographic, social, architectural, and urban development of the city of Paris through time.


Courses

Building Duke

Chateaux of the Loire Valley


Projects

Building Duke

Mapping Stereotomy

Paris of Waters


Publications & Presentations

Galletti, Sara. “Philibert de L’Orme’s theory of stereotomy in the Premier tome de l’architecture. Thinking3D. April 16, 2018.

Galletti, Sara. “Stereotomy and the Mediterranean: Notes Toward an Architectural History.” Mediterranea: International Journal on the Transfer of Knowledge. 2, March 30, 2018.

Galletti, Sara. “Mapping Stereotomy: Vaulting in the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean.” Digital Matters in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Duke University, Durham, NC, April 6-7, 2018.

Hannah Jacobs

Digital Humanities Specialist
| CV || website || contact |

Hannah provides instruction and conducts research in digital concepts and tools for Wired! courses and projects. She leads tutorials and workshops, collaborates with faculty to develop and implement digital humanities projects in the classroom, consults on faculty research, offers advising on digital tools for undergraduate and Master’s student theses, provides technical support for lab projects, and liaises with other digital humanities staff at Duke.

Hannah holds an MA in Digital Humanities from King’s College London (2013) and a BA in English/Theatre from Warren Wilson College (2011). She is currently pursuing an MS in Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2018-present). She is interested in challenges of conducting and representing historical research via data and visualization; project management in digital humanities; applications of digital technologies in humanities pedagogies; and potentials of visual interactive storytelling for scholarly communications, public outreach, and education. She is also a practicing ceramicist, making functional wheel-thrown pottery.

Image Credit: Kaley Deal

 


Courses

Art in Renaissance Italy

Building Duke

Gothic Cathedrals

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar I

Introduction to Art History

Italian Baroque Art

The Lives of Things

Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice

The Medieval Castle in Britain

Visual Cultures of Venice

Visualizing Venetian Art


Projects

Building Duke

Dictionary of Art Historians

The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database

Mapping German Construction

A Portrait of Venice

Statues Speak

Visualizing Objects, Places, and Spaces: Digital Project Handbook

Senses of Venice

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Collaborative Teaching & Digital Visualization in an Art History Classroom.” Visual Resources Association Bulletin, forthcoming.

Presentations

Baltes, Elizabeth P., Caroline Bruzelius, Hannah L. Jacobs, and Timothy Shea. “Digital Thinking and Art History: Re-Imagining Teaching, Research, and the Museum.” Intermezzo Speaking Series, Art, Art History & Visual Studies. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 29, 2015.

Bruzelius, Caroline, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Wired! Full Immersion: Neatline and the Digital Syllabus.” Media Arts + Sciences Rendezvous. Duke University, Durham, NC. March 19, 2015.

Bruzelius, Caroline, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Demonstration: Using a Neatline Syllabus in the Introductory Art History Survey. Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology: “A Signature Pedagogy for Art History in the Twenty-First Century.” College Art Association Annual Conference, Washington, D.C. February 3, 2016.

Holloway, Carson, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “DEVONthink.” DH Studio Workshop, Digital Scholarship Services. Duke University, Durham, NC. March 25, 2015.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Visualizing the New Woman.” Media Arts + Sciences Rendezvous. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 25, 2014.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Visualizing the New Woman.” DH Sandbox Chats, Digital Scholarship Services. Duke University, Durham, NC. February 4, 2015.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Teaching & Learning with Virtual Reality: Learn About It & Experience It.” Learn IT @ Lunch Speaking Series. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 9, 2015.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Reflections on Uses of Spatiotemporal Visualization in a Humanities Classroom.” Visualization & Interactive Systems Friday Forum Speaking Series. Duke University, Durham, NC. October 16, 2015.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Digital Curation in the Arts: Working with the Wired! Lab.” Duke Library Advisory Board. Duke University, Durham, NC. April 8, 2016.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Collaborative Teaching & Critical Digital Making in an Art History Classroom.” Digital Humanities 2016. Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. July 15, 2016.

Jacobs, Hannah L., and Victoria Szabo. “Digital Archiving & Storytelling in the Classroom with Omeka & CurateScape.Digital Humanities 2016. Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. July 12, 2016.

 


News & Events

Digital Pedagogy Series: Practitioners on teaching & research with digital technologies

Digital Humanities Workshop at the National Humanities Center

Paul Jaskot

Director, Wired! Lab | Professor of Art History
| contact |

Paul Jaskot was previously Professor of the History of Art and Architecture and Director of Studio χ at DePaul University. He specializes in the history of modern German architecture and art, with a particular interest in the political history of architecture before, during, and after the Nazi era. He has also published on Holocaust Studies topics more broadly, modern architecture including the history of Chicago architecture, methodological essays on Marxist art history, and diverse topics in Digital Art History. He has authored or edited several monographs and anthologies, including The Nazi Perpetrator: Postwar German Art and the Politics of the Right (University of Minnesota Press, 2012).

Paul has also been deeply involved in Digital Art History issues for the past decade, both as a scholar and as an advocate. In this role, he has been part of the Holocaust Geography Collaborative, an international team of scholars that has been exploring the use of GIS and other digital methods to analyze central problems in the history of the Holocaust, including issues rising from the built environment. He has worked most closely with Anne Kelly Knowles (University of Maine), co-authoring several presentations and essays with her, most recently as part of the anthology Geographies of the Holocaust (University of Indiana Press, 2014), the first volume on the use of GIS for the study of the Holocaust. This work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among other sources.

From 2008-2010, he was the President of the College Art Association (CAA). With CAA, he has also participated in various task forces promoting the support of and guidelines for Digital Art History and its professional evaluation. Paul and Anne also co-directed the Samuel  H. Kress Foundation Summer Institute on Digital Mapping and Art History.  He continues to be active with CAA and with the promotion of Digital Art History initiatives nationally.

Photo Credit: DePaul University/Jeff Carrion


Courses

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 1

History of Pre-Modern Architecture

Politics and Modern Architecture

The Bauhaus


Projects

Digital Public Buildings in North Carolina

Mapping German Construction: From World War I through the Holocaust


Publications & Presentations

Jaskot, Paul B., et al. “Grand Challenges of Art History: Digital/Computational Methods and Social Art History.” The Clark. April 27, 2019.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Digital Art History as the Social History of Art: Towards the Disciplinary Relevance of Digital Methods.” Visual Resources (2019) DOI: 10.1080/01973762.2019.1553651.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Commentary: Art-Historical Questions, Geographic Concepts, and Digital Methods,” Historical Geography 45 (2017): 92-99.

Jaskot, Paul B.Using Digital Humanities to Understand the Architecture of the Holocaust.” Digital Art History Lab Lecture Series, The Frick Collection, New York, NY. October 17, 2017.

Jaskot, Paul B. and Ivo van der Graaff, “”Historical Journals as Digital Sources: Mapping Architecture in Germany, 1914-24,” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 76, no. 4 (December 2017): 483-505.

Jaskot, Paul B. and Anne Kelly Knowles, “Architecture and Maps, Databases and Archives: An Approach to Institutional History and the Built Environment in Nazi Germany,” The Iris (15 February 2017): http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/dah_jaskot_knowles/.

Jaskot, Paul B., Anne Kelly Knowles (University of Maine), and Justus Hillebrand (University of Maine). “GIS and Corpus Linguistics: Mixed Digital Methods for the Exploration of Forced Labor in Krakow District Ghettos.” Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies, USC Shoah Foundation, Los Angeles, CA. October 23, 2017.

Jaskot, Paul B. Keynote. Duke University Research Computing Symposium, Durham, NC. January 22, 2018.


News & Events

Jaskot on Digital Art History as Social History of Art

Digital Pedagogy Series: Practitioners on teaching & research with digital technologies

Digital Humanities Workshop at the National Humanities Center

Visualization Friday Forum: Spatial Analysis of the Holocaust

Jaskot part of NEH grant for The Holocaust Ghettos Project

Jaskot to speak at Research Computing Symposium

Neil McWilliam

Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
| CV || website || contact |

Neil McWilliam received his D.Phil. from the University of Oxford. His publications include Dreams of Happiness. Social Art & the French Left 1830-1850 (with a revised translation in French, 2007) and Monumental Intolerance, Jean Baffier, A Nationalist Sculptor in fin-de-siècle France and A Bibliography of Salon Criticism in Paris from the July Monarchy to the Second Republic 1831-1851 . His research focuses on the visual culture of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France, and in particular, on public sculpture, the Academy, art criticism, and the inter- relationship between aesthetics and political ideologies during the period. In recent years, McWilliam has published widely on the relationship between conservative politics and the arts in France, exploring the impact of nationalist groupings on artistic production, critical writing and art history in the decades before the First World War. His ongoing interest in the career of Symbolist painter Emile Bernard involves a particular focus on this artist’s turn in the 1890s towards a strongly traditionalist artistic practice, and its ramifications for understanding the relationship between tradition and innovation in fin-de-siècle French art.


Courses

Paris: A City and Its Culture, 1850-1930

Mark J.V. Olson

Assistant Professor of the Practice of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Mark Olson is Assistant Professor of the Practice of Visual & Media Studies at Duke University. He teaches courses on media (new & old – theory, practice, & history) and medicine & visual culture. As a extension of his past work with the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media & Learning Initiative, he collaborates on the development of a new interdisciplinary project that connects the study of the material culture of art history, architecture and archaeology with new media modes of representation and visualization. Olson is the former Director of New Media & Information Technologies for HASTAC (Humanties, Arts, Sciences & Technology Advanced Collaboratory) and the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary & International Studies.


Courses

Historical and Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

New Media, Memory, and the Visual Archive

The Museum Inside Out

Topics in Visual Studies: 3D Design Programming


Projects

Alife Arch App

Art of the Americas Interactive

Building Duke

The Lives of Things

Operating Archives: An Interactive Archive of Historical Medical Technologies

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Lanzoni, Kristin, Olson, Mark J.V., and Szabo, Victoria E. “Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History.” Artl@s Bulletin. Forthcoming 2015.

Olson, Mark J.V. “Hacking the Humanities: 21st Century Literacies and the ‘Becoming-Other’ of the Humanities” in E. Belfiore and A. Upchurch (Eds.). Humanities in the Twenty-First Century : Beyond Utility and Markets. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. pp. 237-250.
doi: 10.1057/9781137361356.0021

Presentations

Bruzelius, Caroline, Mark J.V. Olson, Donatella Calabi, Andrea Giordano, Victoria E. Szabo. “Visualizing Venice.” Florentia Illustrata. Digital Mapping and Techniques of Visualizing the Pre-modern Italian City. Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut. Florence, Italy. June 17, 2013.

Dillon, Sheila, Mark J.V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials.” Invited Presentation. C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. February 17, 2010.

Olson, Mark J.V. “Toward a Process Ontology for Digital Archives.” Invited Keynote. North Carolina Preservation Consortium Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC. November 2, 2012.

Olson, Mark J.V. “Digital Technologies and the Social Life of Things: The Wired Lab at Duke University.” Panel Presentation, Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities. Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference. Greensboro, NC. November 1, 2013.

Olson, Mark J.V. “Storytelling with Sources: Open Source Digital Humanities.” Invited Lecture. Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY. June 3, 2014.

Olson, Mark J.V. and Elizabeth P. Baltes, Erica Sherman, Victoria Szabo. “Digital Scholarly Communication – Notes from the Wired! Lab for Digital Historical Visualization,” HASTAC 2011 Conference, Ann Arbor, MI, December 02, 2011.

Olson, Mark J.V. and Caroline Bruzelius. “Learning by Making: Digital Methods and the Wired! Experiment at Duke University.” Invited Public Lecture. Inaugural Lecture, Wesleyan Digital and Computational Knowledge Initiative, Wesleyan University. March 6, 2013.


News & Events

Virtual Tour of the Nasher’s Cultures of the Sea

Visualizing Venice: The Ghetto of Venice

Visualizing Venice: The Waters of Venice

Visualizing Venice Wired! Workshop

Raquel Salvatella de Prada

Assistant Professor of the Practice of Visual and Media Arts
| website || contact |

Raquel Salvatella de Prada is a computer artist and assistant professor of the practice of Visual and Media Arts. She practices graphic design, motion graphics and video design. Her work often focuses on integrating computer animation and motion design with different traditional art forms by collaborating with artists of diverse backgrounds such as printmaking, painting, installation art, poetry, puppetry, theater, and musical performance. She finds that the combination of her digital medium with physical visual media can be a powerful way to communicate social issues. Her experimental animation work and her collaborative performance pieces have been featured at festivals and on stages across the country and internationally.


Courses

3D Modeling & Animation

Motion Graphics in Film & Video


Projects

Augmenting Urban Experiences


Publications & Presentations

Dillon, Sheila, Mark J.V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials.” Invited Presentation. C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. February 17, 2010.

Victoria Szabo

Associate Research Professor, Visual and Media Studies & Program Director, Information Science + Information Studies
| CV || website || contact |

Victoria Szabo is Associate Research Professor of Visual and Media Studies in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies. She is also the Program Director for Information Science + Information Studies,  the Director of Graduate Studies for the PhD in Computational Media, Arts & Cultures, and the Director of the Duke Digital Humanities Initiative at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute and Co-Director of the PhD Lab in Digital Knowledge. She is also co-lead of the Bass Connections Information, Society & Culture theme. She is former co-Director of the Franklin Humanities Institute’s GreaterThanGames Lab. Her interests are in in digital media and cultures, in theory and in practice. Her current projects focus on spatial and augmented reality technologies such as interactive maps, virtual worlds, games, and hybrid reality systems, and how they can be applied to humanities teaching and research. She is also interested in the digital remediation of historic archives and exhibitions, and is a member of the Visualizing Venice consortium, as well as a partner on the NC Jukebox and Digital Durham projects. She co-creates media art projects with Psychasthenia Studio and also leads the ACM SIGGRAPH Digital Arts Community. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Rochester and worked as a professional academic technology developer at Stanford before coming to Duke in 2006.


Courses

Digital Cities

Digital Cities: Representing the Past and Inventing the Future

Historical and Cultural Visualization Proseminar 1


Projects

Augmenting Urban Experiences

Building Duke

Digital Durham

Duke/Durham Ghosts

Ghett/App

Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany Collaboration

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Bruzelius, Caroline, Mark J.V. Olson, Donatella Calabi, Andrea Giordano, Victoria E. Szabo. “Visualizing Venice.” Florentia Illustrata. Digital Mapping and Techniques of Visualizing the Pre-modern Italian City. Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut. Florence, Italy. June 17, 2013.

Bruzelius, Caroline and Victoria E. Szabo. “The Lives of Places and Cities: New models of representation and their conceptual implications for the past and present.” Seminario Internazionale: Promosso dagli insegnamenti: Storia dell’architettura e Disegno edile. Università degli Studi di Padova. Padua, Italy. June 9, 11, and 16, 2014.

Lanzoni, Kristin, Olson, Mark J.V., and Szabo, Victoria E. “Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History.” Artl@s Bulletin. Forthcoming 2015.

Szabo, Victoria E., “Transforming Art History Research with Database Analytics: Visualizing Art Markets.” Art Documentation 31: 2 (2012): 158-175.

Szabo, Victoria, “Knowledge in 3D: How 3D data visualization is reshaping our world.” Parameters. July 11, 2018.

Presentations

Jacobs, Hannah L., and Victoria Szabo. “Digital Archiving & Storytelling in the Classroom with Omeka & CurateScape.Digital Humanities 2016. Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. July 12, 2016.

Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman and Victoria Szabo. Temple University Libraries Symposium on Digital Cultures. Philadelphia, PA. October 21, 2014.

Szabo, Victoria E. “Visual Studies and Digital Humanities”, Invited Speaker, 20th Anniversary of Visual and Cultural Studies Series. University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, March 30, 2010 – April 1, 2010.

Szabo, Victoria E. “Building the Digital City: New Media Theory Meets Digital Humanities Practice.” HASTAC 2013 Conference. Toronto, Ontario. April 27, 2013.

Szabo, Victoria E. “Visualizing the Past: Database-Driven Exploration in Hybrid Reality Systems.” Digital Humanities Symposium – Florentia Illustrata. Center for Disciplinary Innovation, University of Chicago, Chicago IL. January 13-14, 2014.

Szabo, Victoria E. “On Site and On Location: Digital Heritage and the 21st Century Museum.” Centre de Recerca i Debat. Museo D’Historia de Barcelona. Barcelona, Spain. June 26, 2014.

Szabo, Victoria E. “Augmented Humanities Practice: The Fluid Site of Annotation.” Society for Literature, Science and the Arts (SLSA). Dallas, TX. October 11, 2014.


News & Events

Digital Heritage International Congress 2013

Visualizing Venice: The City and the Lagoon

Visualizing Venice: The Ghetto of Venice

Visualizing Venice: The Waters of Venice

Visualizing Venice Wired! Workshop

Augustus Wendell

Assistant Professor of the Practice, Computational Media
| website |

Augustus Wendell is an educator, technologist and designer. Augustus has an MFA in Computer Art from The School of Visual Arts and an undergraduate degree from Northeastern University. He researches the intersection of the built environment and digital inquiry and has published on digital humanities and heritage, digital design research and design education. Prior to his appointment at Duke he taught at the New Jersey Institute of Technology where he directed the Digital Design degree and was the director of the Motion Analysis Lab and the Virtual Reality Lab. Augustus has also held appointments at Parsons the New School for Design, The New York School of Interior Design and Virginia Tech. As owner and creative director at kim.wendell design llc, Augustus has directed visual imagery campaigns for numerous national and international clients.


Courses

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

Immersive Virtual Worlds


Projects

Building Duke