Art in Renaissance Italy

Spring 2021 | Spring 2016

ARTHIST 255-01 | MEDREN 225-01 | ITALIAN 386-01

Kristin Huffman

M 1:45-4:15PM Online

This course focuses on the art and culture of Renaissance Italy, beginning in the early 15th century with the groundbreaking sculpture of Ghiberti and Donatello and concluding at the end of the 16th century with the monumental projects of urban renewal in Rome. The class considers a range of artists, some well known such as Michelangelo and Titian, others less studied but who also made significant contributions to the period. An understanding of emerging Renaissance artistic ideals and a modern attitude to art is central to the subject; additionally, this class seeks to develop an awareness of the many ways in which Renaissance spectators experienced art and architecture. By opening up the Renaissance to varied perceptions and interpretative frameworks, this class moves beyond common generalizations of Renaissance individualism or Renaissance rebirth. To do this, a range of topics and issues will be explored that include important, yet at times overlooked themes in a survey course: public versus private display, “high and low” art (painting, sculpture, architecture vs. textiles, glass, ceramics, furniture), visual imagery used both to promote and subvert politically driven propaganda, foreign communities and foreign artists, women as both patrons and practitioners, centers and peripheries (cosmopolitan versus “provincial” art).

Course Attributes:

(CCI) Cross Cultural Inquiry
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance
(CZ) Civilizations

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

Spring 2021 | Spring 2020 | Spring 2018 | Spring 2017 | Spring 2015

HCVIS 581S-01 | ARTHIST 581S-01 | CMAC 581S-01 | VMS 581S-01 | ISIS 581S-01

Augustus Wendell

TuTh 8:30AM - 9:45AM Online

Interactivity and online content management with 2D and 3D imaging and interactive systems.  Mini-projects based on existing and new research data from the Wired! Lab and elsewhere. Best practices for digital research project planning and collaboration. Theoretical topics include: critical digital heritage, virtuality and culture, information aesthetics, hypermedia information design.

Proseminar 1 is not a prerequisite. This course is required for all MA in Digital Art History/Computational students.

Undergraduates:

Instructor consent required.

Attributes:

Seminar
(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance


Courses

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar on Models: History, Theory & Digital Practice

Gothic Cathedrals

Spring 2021 | Fall 2020 | Fall 2018 | Fall 2017 | Fall 2016 | Fall 2015 | Fall 2014 | Fall 2012

ARTHIST 225-01 & 225-01L | MEDREN 215-01

Edward Triplett

TTh 8:30-9:45AM Online

This course introduces students to the history and design of cathedrals and monasteries in medieval Europe. Themes include the development of Gothic architecture from Romanesque foundations in France, the importance of fractions and Euclidean geometry for medieval architects, and the material and financial costs of monumental construction projects during the middle ages. In addition to lectures and discussion, students will design a counterfactual monastery or cathedral using 3D graphics software as part of a final project. In-class tutorials will teach students how to draw plans, elevations and sections of churches and monastic buildings and how to build 3D models from these drawings.

Course Attributes:

(CCI) Cross Cultural Inquiry
(R) Research
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance
(CZ) Civilizations

This course was formerly offered by Professor Emerita Caroline Bruzelius. In Fall 2018, it was offered as a First Year Seminar under the name “Medieval Monasteries & Cathedrals.”


Projects

Cathedral of Saint Susanne